Violence on college campuses

However, there is still very little understanding of the definition of rape, and what is behind it.

Violence on college campuses

Among graduate students and professionals, the estimates were 8. Because of vulnerability associated with being a minority, LGBTQ people are more likely to experience sexual violence than their heterosexual peers.

Their psychological model states that men who display hostile masculinity traits e. Their findings have been replicated in college student samples and non-student adult samples Malamuth Violence on college campuses al.

Further, narcissistic entitlement and trait aggression have been identified as major individual risk factors for rape LeBreton et al. In regards to victims, white women, first-year students, non-students on college campuses, prior victims, and women who are more sexually active are more vulnerable to being sexually assaulted.

For instance practices, rules, distribution or resources, and the ideologies of the university or college can promote unhealthy beliefs about gender and can in turn contribute to campus sexual assault. Both athletic males and fraternities have higher rates of sexual assault.

The commonality between the two instances are the involvement of alcohol. Assailants are not limited to these two situations however there can also be a connection made in regards to their status in school.

Black women in America are more likely to report sexual assault that has been perpetrated by a stranger. Out of 1, students who identified as TGQN These elements may lead to underreporting of the crime. According to research, "myths, stereotypes, and unfounded beliefs about male sexuality, in particular male homosexuality," contribute to underreporting among males.

In addition, "male sexual assault victims have fewer resources and greater stigma than do female sexual assault victims.

Violence on college campuses

Individual factors such as alcohol consumption, impersonal sexual behavior and hostile attitudes toward womenenvironmental and cultural factors such as peer group support for sexual aggression, gender role stress and skewed gender ratiosas well inadequate enforcement efforts by campus police and administrators have been offered as potential causes.

In addition, general cultural notions relating to victim-blaming are at play as the majority of assaults are never reported due to shame or fear.

This time period is often referred to as the "red zone" by sexual assault Violence on college campuses and in sexual assault prevention materials. For instance, the Campus Sexual Assault study found that most sexual assaults occurred after women voluntarily consumed alcohol.

These effects are exacerbated by peer influence about how to act when drinking. The increase of assaults on college campuses can be attributed to the social expectation that students participate in alcohol consumption. The peer norms on American college campuses are to drink heavily, to act in an uninhibited manner and to engage in casual sex.

In a recent lawsuit against Duke university, a Duke administrator, when asked whether verbal consent need be mutual when both participants are drunk, stated, "Assuming it is a male and female, it is the responsibility in the case of the male to gain consent before proceeding with sex.

In the beginning the woman agrees to kissing and touching but once the man tries to remove her clothes and she refuses the male becomes more aggressive verbally and physically. The findings suggest that intoxicated men may project their own sexual arousal onto a women, missing or ignoring her active protest.

Fulfilling the role of the parties produced vulnerability on the part of women, which some men exploit to extract non-consensual sex. As the study by Armstrong, Hamilton, and Sweeney suggests it might be one of the reasons for the under-reporting of rape where because of having been drinking victims fear that they will be ignored or not believed.

Both the self-reported proclivity to commit rape in a hypothetical scenario, as well as self-reported history of sexual aggression, positively correlate with the endorsement of rape tolerant or rape supportive attitudes in men. Kimmel defines these environments as "…one in which the incidence of rape is reported by observers to be high, or rape is excused as a ceremonial expression of masculinity, or rape as an act by which men are allowed to punish or threaten women.

Under Title IX, schools are required to make efforts to prevent sexual violence and harassment, and to have policies in place for investigating complaints and protecting victims. Research shows that more female law enforcement officers increases the number of sexual assault reports. The book broadened the perception of rape from a crime by strangers, to one that more often included friends and acquaintances, and raised awareness.

As early as the s, campus rape was considered an under-reported crime. Reasons included to the involvement of alcohol, reluctance of students to report the crime, and universities not addressing the issue. The Clery Act requires that all schools in the U.

In Marchthe National Alliance to End Sexual Violence NAESV conducted a survey in conjunction with Know Your IX regarding the right of the survivor to choose to report the assault to police authorities versus legislation which would enforce legal action upon reporting sexual assault to a university or college.

The policies require students to receive ongoing and active consent throughout any sexual encounter. Schools can include drug or alcohol intoxication in their considerations of whether a student granted consent under this policy such that a "drunk" student cannot give consent. These policies are challenging to students because non-verbal cues are difficult to interpret and the policies are confusing.

In MayAmerican Law Institute overwhelmingly rejected a proposal to endorse affirmative consent which would have otherwise required it to be included in the penal codes. A letter written to the committee by members stated "By forcing the accused to prove the near-impossible — that a sexual encounter was vocally agreed upon at each stage — affirmative consent standards deny the accused due process rights.

The first " Take Back the Night " march took place in in San Francisco, and then spread to many college campuses.

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Lena Sclove, a student at Brown Universitymade headlines for saying that a fellow student, who reportedly sexually assaulted her, was not sufficiently punished after he received a one-year suspension. He was found responsible under the university's preponderance of the evidence standard.

Such cases have led to controversy and concerns regarding presumption of innocence and due processand have also highlighted the difficulties that universities face in balancing the rights of the accuser and the rights of the accused when dealing with sexual assault complaints.Campus Sexual Assault Study, ; Matthew Kimble, Andrada Neacsiu, et.

Al, Risk of Unwanted Sex for College Women: Evidence for a Red Zone, Journal of American College Health (). Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Bureau of Justice Statistics, Campus Law .

Sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking are serious problems on college and university campuses. OVW’s Campus Program awards grants to institutions of higher education to help create effective, comprehensive, and sustainable strategies to prevent and respond to these crimes.

The Truth About Domestic Violence on College Campuses November 30, // by Anna Libertin Recently, sexual assault at colleges and universities has been a major topic of discussion in the media. Sexual Violence Is More Prevalent at College, Compared to Other Crimes About 1 in 6 college-aged female survivors received assistance from a victim services agency.

2 21% of TGQN (transgender, genderqueer, nonconforming) college students have been sexually assaulted, compared to 18% of non-TGQN females, and 4% of non-TGQN males.

2. Reports of sexual assault on college campuses have surged dramatically in the past 15 years, according to a new federal study, while all other reported on-campus crimes have decreased..

But the. The research has also addressed particular aspects of violence on IHE campuses, such as stalking, domestic violence, courtship violence, campus sexual assault, hazing, and drug/alcohol induced.

Crime on College Campuses in the U.S.